Recent Posts

Sump Pumps 101

6/12/2017 (Permalink)

If you've explored other ways of keeping your basement dry — examining the grading around your home and repairing any noticeable leaks or broken pipes — and are still having trouble, it might be time to consider a sump pump.

Remember, sump pumps don't prevent water from accumulating, but they can go a long way in controlling water in your basement. Either way, your possessions stay dry, and that's the point.

Many homes have sump pits built right into the basement floor. If this is the case, all you'll need is the pump itself. If your home is not equipped with a sump pit, a drain expert or contractor should be able to tell you if it's possible to retrofit your basement.

Types of sump pumps

There are three types of pumps used in basements or crawl spaces:

  • Pedestal Sump Pump: Also referred to as a "column type" or "upright" sump pump, the pedestal sump pump has an open motor that is supported on top of a column attached to the pump casing. When installed, the motor sits outside the sump and above the basement floor. The motor is not designed to be submerged in water.
  • Submersible Sump Pump: This pump uses a watertight motor designed to be immersed in water, and will typically kick into action when it senses that it's become submerged. The motor is coupled directly to the pump casing and is designed to be completely hidden within the sump.
  • Water-Powered Sump Pump: Water-powered sump pumps are generally much less powerful than pedestal or submersible pumps, but may have some advantage: They run on city water pressure instead of electrical power. However, because they require significant water pressure to function efficiently, they often can't be used if your city water pressure is low or limited, or if your house gets its water from a private well.

A working system

So what does a functioning sump pump system look like? There are usually three key pieces:

  • A Primary Pump
  • An Emergency Backup Pump (Battery- or Water-Powered)
  • An Emergency Backup Pump Alarm

Because homes sometimes lose power during thunderstorms — just when an operational sump pump is critical — many pumping systems employ a backup pump. Emergency battery backup pumps work when the power goes out, when the primary pump does not remove the water fast enough, or if the primary pump fails.

In this setup, primary pumps are powered with electricity, and backup pumps are battery- or water-powered. Using two pumps instead of one makes it unlikely that both pumps will malfunction at the same time. And with the alarm system, you'll be able to tell when the primary pump has failed and the backup pump has to be used.

Is a sump pump right for you?

Installing a new sump pump system — especially if your basement doesn't already have a built-in sump pit - is an extensive, complex job. Make sure you consult with a plumbing expert.

And to find out more about particular pumps for your basement, or to check if a certain pump is certified, consult the Sump & Sewage Pump Manufacturers Association.

Source: https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/residence/sump-pump-basics?cmpid=SimpleInsights:Facebook:Content:17-1526298&https%3A%2F%2Fad.doubleclick.net%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F322740317%3B152524933%3By&utm_source=m.facebook.com&utm_medium=referral

A Clean Home Sells Faster!

4/17/2017 (Permalink)

Cleaning A Clean Home Sells Faster! Before and after mold remediation in Ste. Gen., MO. We make it look like it never even happened.

In today's real estate marketplace, you have have an edge with a reputation for having quality listings. You also want the ability to move a sale through quickly to get your commission. Presentation is everything.

SERVPRO of Farmington will inspect a property- including crawl spaces- to help determine the extent of water or mold damage and remove potentially harmful bacteria and odors.

So before you risk your buyer's health or the opportunity to close the sale of the property, call your local cleanup and restoration professionals at SERVPRO of Farmington.

Real value is packaged in green.

Call us today at 573-756-5191 or email us at office@SERVPRO9766.com

 

When the severe storm rolls out..we roll in!

4/5/2017 (Permalink)

Watch vs. Warning


A severe thunderstorm watch means that the potential exists for the development of thunderstorms which may produce large hail or damaging winds. A watch is issued by the SPC (Storm Prediction Center).


A severe thunderstorm warning means that a severe thunderstorm is occurring or is imminent based on Doppler radar information or a reliable spotter report. A warning is issued by the local National Weather Service office.


_______________________________________


Watch vs. Warning and Storm Basics are provided by NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration). For more information visit their website: www.noaa.gov


Storm Basics


A thunderstorm is a rain shower which you hear thunder. Since thunder comes from lightning, all thunderstorms have lightning.


A thunderstorm is classified as "severe" when it contains one or more of the following:



  • Hail (One inch or greater)

  • Winds in excess of 58 mph

  • Structural wind damage

  • Tornado


Tornado Facts


Tornadoes are arguably nature’s most violent storms. Generated from powerful thunderstorms, tornadoes generally appear as rotating, funnel-shaped clouds extending from the cloud base to the ground. With winds that can reach up to 300 miles per hour, tornadoes can cause massive destruction within seconds. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and fifty miles long.



  • The average tornado moves southwest to northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction.  

  • The average forward speed of a tornado is 30 miles per hour, but may vary from stationary to 70 miles per hour.

  • Tornadoes can accompany tropical storms and hurricanes as they move onto land.

  • Tornadoes are most frequently reported east of the Rocky Mountains during spring and summer months.

  • Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.


Before the Storm



  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency supply kit and make a family communication plan.

  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm.

  • Postpone outdoor activities. n Remember the 30/30 Lightning Safety Rule: Go indoors if, after seeing lightning, you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder.

  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.

  • Get inside a home, building, or hard top automobile (not a convertible). Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.

  • Remember, rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. However, the steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal.

  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.

  • Unplug any electronic equipment well before the storm arrives.


During the Storm



  • Use your battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio for updates from local officials.

  •  Avoid contact with corded phones. Use a corded telephone only for emergencies. Cordless and cellular telephones are safe to use.

  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords. Unplug appliances and other electrical items such as computers and turn off air conditioners. Power surges from lightning can cause serious damage.

  • Avoid contact with plumbing. Do not wash your hands, do not take a shower, do not wash dishes, and do not do laundry. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity.

  • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.

  • Do not lie on concrete floors and do not lean against concrete walls.

  • Avoid natural lightning rods such as a tall, isolated tree in an open area.

  • Avoid hilltops, open fields, the beach or a boat on the water.

  • Take shelter in a sturdy building. Avoid isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas.

  • Avoid contact with anything metal—tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles, golf carts, golf clubs, and bicycles.

  • If you are driving, try to safely exit the roadway and park. Stay in the vehicle and turn on the emergency flashers until the heavy rain ends. Avoid touching metal or other surfaces that conduct electricity in and outside the vehicle.


After the Storm



  • Never drive through a flooded roadway.

  • Stay away from storm-damaged areas to keep from putting yourself at risk from the effects of severe thunderstorms.

  • Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or to local radio and television stations for updated information or instructions, as access to roads or some parts of the community may be blocked.

  • Help people who may require special assistance, such as infants, children and the elderly or those with access or functional needs.

  • Stay away from downed power lines and report them immediately. n Watch your animals closely. Keep them under your direct control.

  • If you have storm damage to your home or property, call SERVPRO of Farmington. Timely mitigation is key to minimize secondary damages caused by severe storms.


SERVPRO of Farmington Services


Unexpected emergencies like severe weather call for immediate action. SERVPRO of Farmington knows immediate reaction to the disaster is important to helping you get your life back to normal.


Utilizing our 1-4-8 Service Response Guidelines*, SERVPRO of Farmington strives to:



  • Contact you within 1 hour from notice of loss to arrange for service.

  • Be on-site to begin mitigation services within 4 hours of notification.

  • Provide verbal briefing of scope to you within 8 business hours of on-site arrival.


SERVPRO of Farmington can also perform pack-out services, which is removing salvageable personal property from the affected area for off-site cleaning and storage.


_______________________________________


*Exceptions may apply under certain conditions, such as a local catastrophic event or storm situation.

The Best Way to Reduce Business Interruption Following a Disaster is to Plan For it NOW.

3/21/2017 (Permalink)

Commercial The Best Way to Reduce Business Interruption Following a Disaster is to Plan For it NOW. SERVPRO of Farmington onsite a Piramal Glass in Park Hills, MO. Piramal Glass suffered a fire in the "Hot End" of the glass factory.

50% of businesses may never recover after suffering a disaster.


Don't be another statistic.


By developing a SERVPRO® Emergency READY Profile for your business, you minimize business interruption by having an immediate plan of action. Knowing what to do and what to expect in advance is the key to timely mitigation and can help minimize how water and fire damage can affect your business.


Are you ready?


Preparation is a key component for making it through any size disaster, whether it’s a small water leak, a large fire or an area flood. The best time for planning for such events is not when the event happens, but well before it happens. No one ever plans on a disaster, but you can plan for it. Now is the time to ask yourself, “Are you ready for whatever could happen?” The SERVPRO® Emergency READY Profile is a start up approach that provides the critical information needed to begin mitigation and recovery services. It is designed to serve as a quick reference of important building and contact information. By working with SERVPRO’s Emergency READY Profile, your business will receive the benefit of over 40 years of experience in reducing the impact of any natural or man-made disaster. SERVPRO® is a leader in water and fire damage response and can help you quickly get your property back in working order.


The SERVPRO® Emergency READY Profile Advantage


A no cost assessment of your facility.


– This means there is no need to allocate funds, giving you a great value at no cost.


A concise Profile Document that contains only the critical information needed in the event of an emergency.


– It will only take a little time to complete and will not take you away from current projects. But it will save a lot of time if ever needed.


A guide to help you get back into your building following a disaster.


– This can help minimize the amount of time your business is inactive by having an immediate plan of action.


Establishes SERVPRO® of Farmington as your disaster mitigation and restoration provider.


– You have a provider that is recognized as an industry leader and close by.


Identification of the line of command for authorizing work to begin.


– This saves time so we can begin the work of mitigating the damage which can save you time and money.


Provides facility details such as shut-off valve locations, priority areas and priority contact information.


– Having a quick reference of what to do, how to do it and who to call provides solutions in advance of an emergency so that during the emergency you are “Ready for whatever happens.”

Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies Makes Sense. Get Ready Now!

3/13/2017 (Permalink)

Community Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies Makes Sense. Get Ready Now! Millie (dog) and Dennis (cat) laying in bed at their home. Prepare for the unexpected to keep your pets safe.

This information was developed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in consultation with: American Kennel Club, The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, American Veterinary Medical Association, and The Humane Society of the U.S, and SERVPRO.


If you are like millions of animal owners nation wide, your pet is an important member of your household. The likelihood that you and your animals will survive an emergency such as fire or flood, tornado, or terrorist attack depends largely on emergency planning done today. Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as assembling an animal emergency supply kit and developing a pet care buddy system, are the same for emergency. Whether you decide to stay put in an emergency or evaluate to a safer location, you will need to make plans in advance for your pets. Keep in mind that what's best for you is typically what's best for your animals.


If you must evacuate, take your pets with you if possible. However, if you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside. Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets. 


Make a back-up emergency plan in case you can't care for your animals yourself. Develop a buddy system with neighbors, friends, and relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to make it on your own for at least three days, maybe longer. Preparing for the unexpected makes sense. Get ready now.


1. Prepare: Get a Pet Emergency Supply Kit


Just as you do with your family's emergency supply kit,think first about the basics for survival, particularly food and water. Consider two kits. In one, put everything you and your pets will need to stay where you are. The other should be a lightweight, smaller version you can take with you if you and your pets have to get away. Plus, be sure to review your kits regularly to ensure that their contents, especially foods and medicines, are fresh.


Food. Keep at least three days of food in an airtight, waterproof container.


Water. Store at least three days of water specifically for your pets in addition to water you need for yourself and your family. Medicines and medical records. Keep an extra supply of medicines your pet takes on a regular basis in a waterproof container.


First aid kit. Talk to your veterinarian about what is most appropriate for your pet's emergency medical needs. Most kits should include cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape and scissors; antibiotic ointment; flea and tick prevention; latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol and saline solution. Include a pet first aid reference book.


Collar with 10 tag, harness or leash. Your pet should wear a collar with its rabies tag and identification at all times. Include a backup leash, collar and 10 tag in your pet's emergency supply kit. In addition, place copies of your pet's registration information, adoption papers, vaccination documents and medical records in a clean plastic bag or waterproof container and also add them to your kit. You should also consider talking with your veterinarian about permanent identification such as microchipping, and enrolling your pet in a recovery database.


Crate or other pet carrier. If you need to evacuate in an emergency situation take your pets and animals with you provided that it is practical to do so. In many cases, your ability to do so will be aided by having a sturdy, safe, comfortable crate or carrier ready for transporting your pet. The carrier should be large enough for your pet to stand, turn around and lie down. Sanitation. Include pet litter and litter box if appropriate, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags and household chlorine bleach to provide for your pet's sanitation needs. You can use bleach as a disinfectant (dilute nine parts water to one part bleach), or in an emergency you can also use it to purify water. Use 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented or color safe bleaches, or those with added cleaners.


A picture of you and your pet together. If you become separated from your pet during an emergency, a picture of you and your pet together will help you document ownership and allow others to assist you in identifying your pet. Include detailed information about species, breed, age, sex, color and distinguishing characteristics.


Familiar items. Put favorite toys, treats or bedding in your kit. Familiar items can help reduce stress for your pet.


2. Plan What You Will Do in an Emergency


Be prepared to assess the situation. Use whatever you have on hand to take care of yourself and ensure your pet's safety during an emergency. Depending on your circumstances and the nature of the emergency the first important decision is whether you stay put or get away. You should understand and plan for both possibilities. Use common sense and the information you are learning here to determine if there is immediate danger. In any emergency, local authorities mayor may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet for instructions. If you're specifically told to evacuate, shelter-in-place or seek medical treatment, do so immediately.


Create a plan to get away. Plan how you will assemble your pets and anticipate where you will go. If you must evacuate, take your pets with you if practical. If you go to a public shelter, keep in mind your animals may not be allowed inside. Secure appropriate lodging in advance depending on the number and type of animals in your care. Consider family or friends willing to take in you and your pets in an emergency. Other options may include: a hotel or motel that takes pets or a boarding facility, such as a kennel or veterinary hosp ital that is near an evacuation facility or your family 's meeting place. Find out before an emergency happens if any of these facilities in your area might be viable options for you and your pets.


Develop a buddy system. Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Talk with your pet care buddy about your evacuation plans and show them where you keep your pet's emergency supply kit. Also designate specific locations , one in your immediate neighborhood and another farther away, where you will meet in an emergency.


Talk to your pet's veterinarian about emergency planning. Discuss the types of things that you should include in your pet's emergency first aid kit. Get the names of vets or veterinary hospitals in other cities where you might need to seek temporary shelter. You should _---","!A also consider talking with your veterinarian about permanent identification such as microchipping, and enrolling your pet in a recovery database. If your pet is microchipped, keeping your emergency contact information up to date and listed with a reliable recovery database is essential to your being reunited with your pet.


Gather contact information for emergency animal treatment. Make a list of contact information and addresses of area animal control agencies including the Humane Society or SPCA, and emergency veterinary hospitals. Keep one copy of these phone numbers with you and one in your pet's emergency supply kit. Obtain "Pets Inside" stickers and place them on you r doors or windows, including information on the number and types of pets in your home to alert firefighters and rescue workers. Consider putting a phone number on the sticker where you could be reached in an emergency. And , if time permits , remember to write the words "Evacuated with Pets" across the stickers, should you flee with your pets.


3. Stay Informed Know About Types of Emergencies


Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as assembling an emergency supply kit for yourself, your family and your pets , is the same regardless of the type of emergency. However, it's important to stay informed about what might happen and know what types of emergencies are likely to affect your region as well as emergency plans that have been established by your state and local government. For more information about how to prepare , visit www.ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY. Be prepared to adapt this information to your personal circumstances and make every effort to follow instructions received from authorities on the scene. With these simple preparations, you can be ready for the unexpected. Those who take the time to prepare themselves and their pets will likely encounter less difficulty, stress and worry. Take the time now to get yourself and your pet ready.

Post Construction

3/6/2017 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Farmington helps ensure your finished projects always look their best.


Post Construction Cleaning


Once the floors are down and the drywall is up, it's time to remove the debris and dirt in order to lay carpet, paint, and decorate. SERVPRO of Farmington can provide the debris removal services to prepare the building for interior design.


Dehumidification and Drying 


During the construction phase, a building can trap moisture.Excessive moisture could result in mold growth. If you think one of your projects may have a moisture issues, rely on SERVPRO of Farmington to provide the help you need eliminating moisture and preventing the potential for mold growth.


Final Cleaning


You want the facility to look its best when the doors open. SERVPRO of Farmington provides cleaning services to give the building that extra shine. Services include:



  • Carpet, resilient and non-resilient floor prep and finish

  • Ceiling, walls, and fixture cleaning

  • Deodorization

  • Air Duct Cleaning

  • Debris Removal (if necessary)

  • Window Cleaning


When The Unexpected Happens... Call SERVPRO of Farmington


The last thing you need is a fire damage, water intrusion, or mold growth slowing down or stopping the completion of one of your projects. SERVPRO of Farmington provides 24- hour emergency mitigation, cleanup, and restoration services to help you get back on schedule quickly.


You Start It... We'll Help You Finish It


Structural integrity, materials, labor, safety, customer satisfaction and deadlines - the list goes on and on when building a commercial facility. The bottom line, however, is you are responsible for getting the doors open on time.


SERVPRO of Farmington can help you meet your deadlines by providing thorough post-construction services in a timely manner. These services include:



  • Post-Construction Cleaning

  • Dehumidification and Drying

  • Final Cleaning

  • Fast-Track Drying

  • Emergency Response Restoration and Cleanup Services


Rely on SERVPRO of Farmington to help ensure your post-construction cleanup gets done as quickly as possible.


We make it, "Like it never even happened." 

When Water Damages Occur, The Wrong Response Can Cost You Plenty.

2/6/2017 (Permalink)

Water Damage When Water Damages Occur, The Wrong Response Can Cost You Plenty. Water damage located in Farmington, MO. This room had standing water that was extracted shortly after this photo was taken.

Even small water damages have the potential to cause serious structural and indoor air quality issues over time. The key to avoiding costly restoration is to handle every water problem as a real threat to your property. If you have questions or need help to ensure your property, contact SERVPRO of Farmington at 573-756-5191. 

Downtown Farmington: Harvest Night

11/1/2016 (Permalink)

Farmington area children were given an early opportunity to dress in costume and collect their Halloween candy on Friday, October 28. SERVPRO of Farmington sponsored one of the many Harvest Night games featuring our well known bounce house. 

Teaching Children About Fire Safety

9/22/2016 (Permalink)

Fire Safety and Prevention Teacher and Parent Resources

Fire Prevention Week was established to remember the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, which began on October 8. Use these worksheets, activities, and lessons to teach your students/child(ren) about fire safety and prevention. Prepare your students/child(ren) for emergency situations with worksheets and literature on fire readiness. October is Fire Prevention Month, but any time of the year is appropriate to enjoy these resources.

Please visit: https://www.teachervision.com/emergency/teacher-resources/47554.html

Mapping Out Your Escape Plan: Multi- Family Dwelling

9/21/2016 (Permalink)

Did you know that if a fire starts in your home, you'll have just two minutes to escape? That's why it's important to have working smoke alarms in your home, develop an escape plan and practice that plan. Practice your plan until everyone in the household can evacuate in less than two minutes. Test smoke alarms every month and replace the batteries as needed. Consider placing escape ladders in rooms on upper floors. Identify two exits from every room. Install smoke alarms on every level of the home, including inside and outside each bedroom and in the basement.